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Readers Respond: Why I Want to Be a Hospice Volunteer

Responses: 9

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Updated November 12, 2009

From the article: Lend a Caring Hand
Why do you want to be a hospice volunteer? Maybe you've had a loved one die and recognize the impact that hospice made in their final months. Perhaps you know you have a special gift that you can use to bring comfort and peace to patients and families when they need it most. Share your reason for wanting to be a hospice volunteer!

Becoming A Volunteer for Hospice

I recently lost two family members to cancer, which was quite devastating. Hospice was a part of the support in which we received and this organization was incredible. I feel like I would like to be on a team of winners and contribute something back to society.
—Guest Carolyn Everett

Hospice

I feel that God called on me to help those that need it most. Dying can be scary but if you do it with people you love and God by your side it is a beautiful journey.
—Guest madison

Hospice Volunteer/perhaps employee

I am gifted in soothing suffering people.I had family in the Hospice and saw the warmth and concern Hospice workers. I have a great deal of experience for those in need of support and encouragement.
—Guest Elizabeth

not sure

i would love to help people my mom when she was so sick they was great with her
—Guest sharon pack

Some Families Don't Care Enough

I am a CNA in a nursing home. Most of the residents who die there either die suddenly (despite being old/in ill health) or with their family surrounding them, but for the past two and a half weeks I have had to watch a beautiful man fighting for his life all alone. His family, two sons and a wife who all live within ten minutes of our facility, have been "too busy" (a.k.a. as in one son's case, golfing) to spend more than 10 minutes at a time with him. I have been close to this particular resident since I started working at the nursing home a year ago, and it kills me to see him suffering with no one there to hold his hand and comfort him. In a way, I feel it's my moral duty to make sure this sweet man does not die alone. I spend hours with him every day, holding his hand and singing to him, and sometimes he sings along, although his voice, like his body, is getting weaker day by day. I've decided to become a hopsice volunteer so I can comfort the dying when their families won't.
—Guest Alex

Some Families Don't

I am a CNA in a nursing home. Most of the residents who die there either die suddenly (despite being old/in ill health) or with their family surrounding them, but for the past two and a half weeks I have had to watch a beautiful man fighting for his life all alone. His family, two sons and a wife who all live within ten minutes of our facility, have been "too busy" (a.k.a. as in one son's case, golfing) to spend more than 10 minutes at a time with him. I have been close to this particular resident since I started working at the nursing home a year ago, and it kills me to see him suffering with no one there to hold his hand and comfort him. In a way, I feel it's my moral duty to make sure this sweet man does not die alone. I spend hours with him every day, holding his hand and singing to him, and sometimes he sings along, although his voice, like his body, is getting weaker day by day. I've decided to become a hopsice volunteer so I can comfort the dying when their families won't.
—Guest Alex

So many reasons . . .

A hospice volunteer eases suffering, if only for a few moments. Being this soothing, comforting presence means so very much to me. I enjoy my work as a hospice volunteer. Usually my patients are quite old, sick and sometimes non-verbal, but I feel that I'm returned twice as much as I give. I'm not sure what to call what I get in return for my attentions to these dear people, but I know it when I feel it. It may be personal satisfaction or it may be some kind of cosmic gift that I don't have a vocabulary for, but it is real. Being a hospice volunteer is a joyous thing, and I'm grateful for these opportunities to help other human beings in need.
—Guest buckigirl

childrens hospice

i want to share my love for children and be there for them at their time of need
—Guest Rae Pursey

Hospice

I realised that dying wasn't a scary thing. That dying was a beautiful journey. This is a positive thing, not negative like the stigma attached to it. I became a hospice vollunteer because... I feel that there is a need for people who can help others feel comfortable with passing over.
—Guest Annie

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